We all know that yoga is a physical, mental and spiritual practice originating in India. In its most common form, yoga consists of a series of physical postures (asanas) combined with breathing techniques (pranayama) and meditation. Through these practices, yoga seeks to integrate the mind, body, and spirit to achieve greater balance and well-being in life.

Thanks to its proven benefits, yoga has become very popular around the world as a way to improve physical and mental health, reduce stress, improve flexibility and strength, and promote greater awareness and mindfulness in life. daily. In addition to asanas, yoga can also include the practice of meditation, philosophy and ethics, and spiritual devotion.

 

The best time for yourself is when you don’t have time for it.

There are many different forms of yoga, each with a unique approach and style. Some popular forms of yoga include Hatha yoga, Vinyasa yoga, Ashtanga yoga, Hot yoga, Kundalini yoga, Iyengar Yoga, Integral Yoga, Yin Yoga, Restorative Yoga, and many others. Each type of yoga can have different goals and benefits, and can be practiced by people of all ages and skill levels.

Hatha Yoga
It is one of the most popular types of yoga worldwide and focuses on the practice of postures (asanas) and breathing techniques (pranayama), muscle and energy closures (bhandas) and meditation techniques and yoga nidra to balance the body and mind.

Hatha yoga is a form of yoga that focuses primarily on the physical practice of asanas, or yoga postures. The term “hatha” is made up of two Sanskrit words: “ha”, which means sun, and “tha”, which means moon. Together these words symbolize the union of opposites, which is reflected in the practice of Hatha yoga, which seeks to balance solar and lunar energy in the body.

Hatha Yoga practice includes a series of physical asanas that are performed slowly and with attention to breathing and body alignment. Hatha Yoga practice can be gentle and accessible for beginners, but it can also be intense and challenging for more advanced practitioners. In addition to asanas, Hatha Yoga practice may also include the practice of pranayama, or breathing, meditation, and relaxation techniques.

The goal of Hatha Yoga is to achieve greater body awareness, balance energy, and improve physical and mental health. Regular Hatha Yoga practice can help improve flexibility, strength, and balance, reduce stress, improve breathing and blood circulation, and promote relaxation and mental clarity.

Ashtanga Yoga
This type of yoga focuses on a prearranged sequence of postures (asanas) and breathing techniques (pranayama) that are practiced in a specific, forceful order to increase strength, flexibility and strenght.

Ashtanga yoga is a dynamic and challenging form of yoga that is based on the practice of a sequence of yoga postures (asanas) in a specific order and synchronized with the breath. The name “Ashtanga” is made up of two Sanskrit words: “ashta”, which means eight, and “anga”, which means limb or branch. Together, these words symbolize the eight limbs of yoga, as described in Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras.

The Ashtanga yoga practice is divided into six series, each with a specific sequence of poses that become more challenging as you progress. Each series focuses on different areas of the body and has different goals and benefits. Ashtanga yoga practice is often more demanding and vigorous than other forms of yoga.

The practice of Ashtanga yoga also includes the practice of pranayama (breathing techniques) and drishti (visual fixation), which help to maintain concentration and attention in the practice. Ashtanga yoga practice may also include mantra repetition and meditation.

The goal of Ashtanga yoga is to develop strength, flexibility, stamina, and concentration. Regular practice of Ashtanga yoga can help improve posture, breathing, blood circulation, and reduce stress. Furthermore, it can be a transformative practice for those seeking a path to self-knowledge and spiritual fulfillment.

Vinyasa Yoga
Also known as “flow yoga”, it focuses on the flowing and continuous movement of the postures, synchronized with the breath.

Vinyasa yoga is an Ashtanga-inspired form of dynamic yoga that focuses on coordinating breath with movement. In Sanskrit, the term “vinyasa” refers to the technique of moving fluidly from one yoga posture to another through a series of movements synchronized with the breath.

The practice of Vinyasa Yoga is done through a series of yoga postures (asanas) in a constant flow, where each movement is connected with the breath. Vinyasa yoga practice is often more intense and challenging than other styles of yoga, but it can be adapted for all ages and skill levels.

In addition to physical practice, Vinyasa Yoga practice can also include the practice of pranayama (breathing techniques) and meditation.

The goal of Vinyasa Yoga practice is to improve strength, flexibility, stamina, and concentration. Regular Vinyasa Yoga practice can help improve posture, breathing, blood circulation, reduce stress, and promote mindfulness. It can also be a transformative practice for those seeking a deeper connection with their body, mind, and spirit.

Iyengar yoga
This type of yoga focuses on precise alignment and postural correction through the practice of postures (asanas) and the use of props such as blocks, belts, and blankets to aid in the practice.

Iyengar Yoga is a form of yoga that focuses on precision and alignment in yoga postures (asanas) and the practice of deep, mindful breathing. It was developed by yoga teacher B.K.S. Iyengar and is based on the principles of classical yoga described in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali.

Iyengar yoga practice is done with the support of props such as blocks, blankets, straps, and chairs to help students achieve proper alignment and hold poses longer. Iyengar yoga students learn to perform yoga poses with precision and control to achieve physical, mental, and emotional balance.

Iyengar yoga practice also focuses on attention to detail and body awareness, helping students develop a deeper understanding of their own body and yoga practice.

The goal of Iyengar yoga practice is to develop strength, flexibility, stability, and awareness of the body and mind. Regular Iyengar yoga practice can help improve posture, reduce pain and stiffness, increase stamina, and reduce stress.

It can also be a transformative practice for those seeking a deeper connection with their body and mind.

Integral Yoga
Holistic approach beyond the physical.

In the practice of integral Yoga, it is not only about the physical postures, but also about the connection between body, mind and spirit. It is about finding balance and harmony in all aspects of life and using the tools of yoga to achieve that goal.

Integral Yoga, also known as Poorna Yoga, is a holistic approach to yoga developed by Sri Aurobindo and his collaborator Mirra Alfassa (also known as “The Mother”) in the early 20th century. This approach integrates different branches of yoga, such as the practice of postures (asanas), breathing techniques (pranayama), meditation, mantra chanting, and study of sacred texts, with the intention of helping the person achieve a state of holistic well-being and a connection with divinity through oneself, without looking outside for what is already inside.

“What men call knowledge is the reasoned acceptance of false appearances. Wisdom looks behind the veil and sees”. Sri Aurobindo

Integral Yoga is based on the idea that the practice of yoga can help a person evolve and transform in all aspects of their life, including physical, mental and emotional health, relationships, work and spirituality. This approach also includes the idea that yoga practice is not limited to just the mat, but can be integrated into all activities and aspects of daily life.

Here are some common practices within the holistic yoga approach:

Asanas: The practice of physical postures focuses on the body and helps improve flexibility, strength and stability. The poses can also help relieve tension and pain in the body, improve circulation, and stimulate internal systems.
Pranayama: The practice of breathing techniques focuses on breathing and helps increase lung capacity, improve oxygenation of the body, and reduce stress and anxiety.
Raja Yoga (Dharana and Dhyana): Meditation practice focuses on the mind and can help calm thoughts and emotions, reduce stress and anxiety, improve concentration, and increase awareness.
Bhakti Yoga: Mantra chanting focuses on the spirit and can help calm the mind, raise the vibration, and connect with the divine.
Jnana Yoga: The study of sacred texts focuses on spiritual development and can help to understand the philosophy of integral yoga and its application in daily life.

Integral Yoga is practiced throughout the world and has had a significant influence on the development of modern yoga. Sri Aurobindo and The Mother founded the Sri Aurobindo Ashram in Pondicherry, India, where Integral Yoga is still practiced as part of its broader spiritual philosophy.

The Sri Aurobindo Ashram is located in Pondicherry, a coastal city in southern India, and is a spiritual and research center where followers practice integral yoga and the philosophy of Sri Aurobindo and The Mother. The Ashram also includes a school and a hospital.

Sri Aurobindo and Mirra Alfassa were also the creators of the city of Auroville, an experimental and utopian community founded by The Mother in 1968, located about 10 kilometers north of Sri Aurobindo’s Ashram in Pondicherry. Auroville describes itself as a “universal city” and seeks to be a place of unity, peace, harmony and spiritual transformation for people from all over the world. The community has a unique organizational structure and is governed by an international council made up of representatives from different countries and cultures. The practice of Integral Yoga is also an important element in the daily life of Auroville.

His contribution to humanity is perhaps one of the most majestic in the history of modern Yoga.

Kundalini Yoga
This type of yoga focuses on the Kundalini energy and uses kriyas, meditation, and mantra chanting to awaken and raise the Kundalini energy.

Kundalini yoga is a form of yoga that focuses on the Kundalini energy, which is believed to be a potentially powerful and creative energy that resides at the base of the spine. The practices are based on the idea that we all have a reserve of creative energy and potential within us that can be released through yoga practice and connection to our spiritual awareness.

Kundalini yoga practice involves kriyas, a series of dynamic exercises, breathing techniques, and meditation that are practiced in sequence to produce a specific effect on the body, mind, and spirit. The kriyas are performed with a combination of yoga postures, breathing, meditation, sounds, mudras (hand gestures), and bandhas (muscular and energetic locks).

Each Kundalini yoga kriya has a specific purpose and is designed to stimulate different parts of the body, the nervous system, organs and systems of the body. Some kriyas may be focused on the digestive system, while others may be focused on the respiratory system, nervous system, Kundalini energy, and meditation.

The goal of Kundalini yoga practice is to develop awareness of the body and mind, increase vital energy, improve physical and emotional health, and achieve spiritual enlightenment. Regular practice of Kundalini yoga can help improve flexibility, balance, strength, and stamina, and reduce stress and anxiety. It can also be a transformative practice for those seeking a deeper connection to their inner self and creative potential.

To get best results, Kundalini kriyas are performed in a specific sequence and are practiced for a set period of time, which can be anywhere from a few minutes to an hour or more. The length of time a kriya is practiced varies depending on the skill level of the student and the nature of the kriya, but they are usually 40 day uninterrupted quarantines.

Kundalini yoga practice may also include mantra recitation, chanting, and music, to help raise energy and awareness. Its creator, Yogi Bhajan has been accused of sexual abuse.

Yogi Bhajan, founder of the organization 3HO (Healthy, Happy, Holy Organization), which promotes Kundalini Yoga. Several women have filed lawsuits and testimonials accusing Bhajan of sexually assaulting them.

These accusations are not related to the practice of Kundalini Yoga itself, but to Bhajan’s behavior as an individual and leader of an organization. Although Bhajan passed away in 2004, these allegations have led many to question his legacy and the validity of the teachings he promoted.

These are just some of the most popular types of yoga, but there are many other types and styles of yoga that are practiced in different parts of the world.

Jivamukti Yoga: This type of yoga focuses on union with the divine through the practice of postures (asanas), breathing techniques (pranayama), meditation, mantra chanting, and study of sacred texts.

Restorative Yoga: This type of yoga focuses on deep relaxation and restoration of the body through the practice of gentle, supported postures (asanas) and the use of props such as blankets, blocks, and pillows.

Yin Yoga: This type of yoga focuses on deep stretching and the release of tension in the deep layers of the muscles and connective tissues of the body through the practice of postures (asanas) held for several minutes.

Anusara Yoga: This type of yoga focuses on precise alignment and connection with the energy of the heart through the practice of postures (asanas), breathing techniques (pranayama), and meditation.

Power Yoga: This type of yoga focuses on strengthening and toning the body through a dynamic practice of postures (asanas) and breathing techniques.

Acro Yoga: This type of yoga combines the practice of yoga postures (asanas) with acrobatics and dance elements to create a fun and challenging practice for a couple or group.

Tibetan Yoga: Also known as Lu Jong, it is a practice that combines physical postures and movements with breathing and meditation techniques to improve physical and mental health.

Hot Yoga: Formerly known as Bikram Yoga, hot yoga is practiced in a room heated to high temperatures and focuses on a specific sequence of 26 postures (asanas) to improve health and flexibility. It has been involved in a great controversy after the scandals of sexual abuse of its controversial creator Bikram Choudhury. Since 2013, several women have filed lawsuits and testimonials accusing Choudhury of sexually assaulting them and creating a hostile and demeaning work environment. In some cases, the courts have ruled in favor of the victims and Choudhury has been forced to pay compensation. It is important to note that these accusations are not related to the practice of yoga, but to Choudhury’s behavior as an individual and leader of an organization. Several people who practiced
Bikram Yoga have decided to separate the practice from its founder following the scandals. Hence the change to the name of Hot Yoga.

Each type of yoga has its own unique characteristics and benefits, and it is important to find the type of yoga that best suits your personal needs and goals.

But overall, regular yoga practice can provide a wide range of physical, mental, and emotional health benefits.

  • Improves flexibility and joint mobility.
  • Strengthens the muscles, especially those of the back and abdomen.
  • Helps improve posture and body alignment.
  • Improves blood circulation and heart health.
  • Reduces blood pressure and stress on the cardiovascular system.
  • Helps control weight and reduce body fat.
  • Improves breathing and lung capacity.
  • Reduces pain and stiffness in the joints.
  • Reduces stress and anxiety.
  • Improves mood and reduces depression.
  • Helps improve concentration and mental clarity.
  • Promotes relaxation and a sense of calm.
  • Improves sleep quality and reduces insomnia.
  • Helps develop self-discipline and self-determination.
  • Promotes the mind-body connection and body awareness.
 
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